22 February, 2010

Soundtrack



via Robert Popper

12 February, 2010

Opening Weekend - 12/02/2010

A Single Man



Tom Ford, co-writer/director interviews

Interview
Collider
IndieWire
FilmMaker

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Astro Boy


David Bowers, co-writer/director interviews:

Japan Times
Collider
Sci-Fi Scanner

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Battle for Terra



Aristomenis Tsirbas, co-writer/director interview:

Terra Trailer
Mania

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Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief


Craig Titley, writer, interviews:

Making Of
Latino Review
Mr Media

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Ponyo


Hayao Miyazaki writer/director interviews:

Collider
LA Weekly
Crave
Daily Telegraph

Interview with writer/director Hayao Miyazaki and director/producer John Lasseter

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Valentine's Day



Katherine Fugate, writer

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The Wolfman



Andrew Kevin Walker and David Self, writers

10 February, 2010

BlueCat create new Best UK Screenplay award


"On behalf of BlueCat Screenwriting’s goal to bring more exposure to UK screenwriters, I’m writing to cordially invite writers in your community to consider submitting a feature length screenplay to the 2010 BlueCat Screenplay Competition.

This year, we have created two new awards for international screenwriters.

The Cordelia Award – Best screenplay from the UK will be awarded $2,500.


The Joplin Award – Best screenplay from outside the US, UK, and Canada will be awarded $2500.


In addition, the scripts will still be eligible for our other prizes."


2010 BlueCat Screenplay Competition
  • Every screenplay receives written script analysis (sample)
  • Winner receives $10,000
  • Four Finalists receive $1500 each.
  • The best screenplay from the UK will receive $2500.
  • The best screenplay from outside the USA, Canada, and the UK will receive $2500
Submit your screenplay

Deadline: 1 March 2010 - entry fee $50.
Late Deadline: 1 April 2010 - entry fee $60.

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BlueCat Screenwriting Tips Video:

"What are some lasting principles for dialogue that transcend genre or style?
"




Other Videos

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About BlueCat:

Since 1998, the first year of the BlueCat Screenplay Competition, we have built a large community of writers passionately committed to writing original, unforgettable work.

This starts with our exchange of feedback to each writer who enters BlueCat, as EVERY screenplay submitted to BlueCat receives written analysis.


Additionally, through our newsletter, we provide articles, videos and interviews to help and inspire every level of screenwriting.

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BlueCat Screenplay Competition PO Box 2635 Los Angeles, CA 90078
Email | Website| Twitter| Facebook

06 February, 2010

20/20 conference: Playwriting/Pedagogy

  • 20 years of the Birmingham Playwriting MA/MPhil(B)
  • 20 new plays by graduate playwrights
  • 20 papers on the pedagogy of playwriting
University of Birmingham, Selly Oak Campus
Saturday 13 March - Sunday 14 March 2010

2009/10 marks the twentieth anniversary of the foundation of what was then the MA in Playwriting in Birmingham, the first course of its kind in Britain. To mark this anniversary, 20/20 will reflect on the impact of the study of playwriting on dramatic writing within the theatre and beyond. The weekend will include the debut of 20 specially commissioned short plays by graduates of the Birmingham course. Panels of speakers will include some of the most active and influential playwrights, academics, and critics working in Britain, Europe, and the USA today.

The conference will attempt to define a lexicon of dramaturgical terms, survey the extent and validity of the playwriting literature, examine how playwriting is taught and nurtured at different levels of educational and artistic endeavour and through a comparative account of its place in the US, Britain and Germany, question what form plays for our times should actually take, ponder the old chestnut that theory and practice don’t mix, look at how playwriting is developed in theatres, on radio and in schools. It will be of interest to any playwright, playwriting teacher, dramaturg, educationalist, theatre practitioner and academic in this field.

20/20 plays by:

Clare Bayley, Craig Baxter, Helen Blakeman, Ben Brown, Stephanie Dale, Rod Dungate, George Gotts, Lucy Gough, Tony Green, Fraser Grace, Sarah Grochala, Nancy Harris, Duncan Macmillan, Charles Mulekwa, Amy Rosenthal, Carolyn Scott Jeffs, Tim Stimpson, Anthony Weigh, Lance Woodman, Sarah Woods

Panellists include

Mark Bly is the Senior Dramaturg and Director of New Play Development at the Alley Theatre, Houston, TX.

David Edgar plays include Destiny, The Life and Times of Nicholas Nickleby, Testing the Echo founder of the MA in Playwriting whose book How Plays Work is published by Nick Hern

Dr Ken Cerniglia is a theatre scholar and dramaturg, who works for Disney Theatricals, and will offer the view from Broadway.

Maja Zade works as a Dramaturg at the Lehninerplatz Schaubühne, which has led Europe in establishing the collaboration of the playwright, the director, and the dramaturg in producing new work. Zade has also worked as a senior reader at the Royal Court Theatre.

Jack Bradley dramaturg and writer, former literary manager National Theatre.
Dan Rebellato Cathy Turner, Mary Luckhurst, Kara Reilly, Ian Brown, Karen Juers Munby, Liz Tomlin, Steve Waters, Anthony Weigh, Julie Wikinson, Peter Wild, Caroline Jester and others….

Fees: £130 full rate/ £75 concessionary.
Includes two lunches, dinner and drinks on Saturday night, all conference events and two performances of the 20/20 plays.

Further information

For more information, contact Steve Waters

In partnership with the British Theatre Conference

British Theatre Conference logo

01 February, 2010

New US shows on this week

The Cleveland Show

Mondays, E4, 10:00pm
Wednesdays, E4, 11:00pm

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Tuesdays, ITV2, 9:00pm
Fridays, ITV2, 8:00pm

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Caprica

Tuesdays, Sky1, 9:00pm
Wednesdays, Sky 2, 9:00pm

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Melrose Place

Wednesdays, Fiver, 9:00pm
Fridays, Fiver, 8:00pm

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Private Practice

Thursdays, Virgin1, 9:00pm

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Lost

Fridays, Sky1, 9:00pm
Saturdays, Sky2, 9:00pm

Back Up Your Data Day

It's the first of the month which means it's Back Up Your Data Day (although it should be done day-to-day!).

We can also use this day to delete stuff we no longer need and defragment our hard drive(s) to keep our machine lean and clean, if you know what I mean.

Windows guide to defragmenting
Mac users don't have to defragment, apparently.

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How To: Back Up All Your Stuff For Free, No Hard Drive Needed

Gizmo:


"People don't neglect backing up their computers because it's hard—it isn't, at all. No, people file into the inevitable death march of data loss for one reason: Backing up usually costs money. But it doesn't have to.

When your concerned friends and family insist that you have to back your data up (as anyone who's seen my atrociously beaten-down laptop in the last few months has done to me) they're effectively telling you two things: That backing up your data will save you a massive headache in the future, because more likely the not, your hard drive will fail; and, less bluntly, that you need to buy a hard drive. And who wants to do that? It's hard to lay out the cash for a backup hard drive, since the payoff is uncertain, and (hopefully) far away. It's a good investment—not an easy one.

The good news is, most of us cheapskates can still keep our most important files safe without spending a dime, or wasting more than a few minutes. Here how:

Note: These methods don't give you traditional, full backups—they are ways to keep copies of the files that matter most to you, like your documents, photos, music and videos."

Article in full

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A reminder about Matt's simple and effective back-up:

"I have never been able to get the hang of proper backup software and procedures. I always end up getting into a complete pickle about the various full backups, interim backups and how the bloody hell I'd back everything up if my hard-drive became shot with the backup software on it. So these days I just have a complete clone of My Documents on a portable drive and use Microsoft's Synctoy to keep the files up to date."

However I would suggest backing up your entire Documents and Settings folder and not just the My Documents part of it as it which would include emails and favourites/bookmarks. This link has more details.

I asked Lee about the Mac equivalent:

"Things like emails, bookmarks, fonts, templates, RSS feeds, Applescripts - anything used by an application, but not created by it when you hit Save - are kept in your Home folder, in the Library. In Mac speak, that's ~/Library. Apple apps such as Mail, Safari, and iTunes may have their own folders. Non-Apple apps like NetNewsWire, Montage, Final Draft, Scrivener etc, will keep all their stuff in ~/Library/Application Support. The truly paranoid might want to back up their preference files as well. I know I do. These are in ~/Library/Prefences.

For safety's sake, back up the entire Library folder, it's probably only a few hundred megs."

Jason Sutton added:

"Backing up Macs is impossibly easy. Buy an external hard drive and use Time Machine. It's built in to OS X. The best back-ups are the ones you don't have to think about. Brilliant application."

Thank you Matt and Lee and Jason!

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Don't delay, do it today. It's Back Up Your Data Day, hooray!